Lesser Known Places to Visit Across the World

 Dominica

Dominica is one of the Caribbean islands located between the Caribbean sea and the Atlantic Ocean, also between Guadeloupe and Martinique. Being the second largest of the Windward Islands Dominica is about four times the size of Washington D.C.
Dominica has rugged mountains of volcanic origin and has constant flash flood threats. Despite the mountains the island has a tropical climate with heavy rainfall and is covered by tropical rain forests which home  1,200 plant species.

Dominica-Island

Bhutan

The princely Kingdom of Bhutan is a landlocked country, about 300 km long and 150 km wide encompassing an area of 46,500 square kilometers. Located between longitude 88045′ and 92010′ East and latitudes 26040′ and 28015′ North in the Eastern Himalayas, it is bounded by India in South and South-West and Tibetan autonomous region of China in the North and North-West respectively.

Extending from Mt. Chomolhari (7,314m) in the West to Kulha Gangri (7,554m) near the center point of the northern border between Tibet and Bhutan, this region is virtually a snow-wilderness zone where almost 20% of the land is under perpetual snow. This zone is represented by alpine meadows and perpetually snow bound high summit of the Great Himalayan range.

bhutan

Vietnam

Vietnam has an age-old and special culture that is closely attached to the history of the formation and development of the nation.

Historians have shared a common view that Vietnam has a fairly large cultural community that was formed around the first half of the first millenium B.C. and flourished in the middle of this millenium. That was Dong Son cultural community. This culture attained a degree of development higher than that of others at that time in the region and had its own characteristics but still bore the features of Southeast Asian culture because of the common South Asian racial root (Southern Mongoloid) and the wet rice culture. Different development routes of local cultures in various areas (in the deltas of Red River, Ma River, Ca River and so on) joined together to form the Dong Son culture. This was also the period of the very “embryonic” state of Vietnam in the form of inter- and super-village community, which came into being and existed in order to resist invaders and to build and maintain dykes for rice cultivation. From this pattern of “embryo” state, primitive tribes grew into nations.

Vietnam-riverside

 

 

Honduras

There’s Belize. There’s Costa Rica. There’s even Guatemala. But for real bargain-basement Central American value, plump for Honduras. The country isn’t up there on the most-visited lists, but if you do decide to give it a go you’ll discover white sand beaches reminiscent of the Maldives, diving to rival the Red Sea, and mega cheap food and drink – all while spending less than £20 a day. For the Caribbean at a fraction of the cost, check out the swathes of pristine beaches along Honduras’s northern coast. One of the busiest centres along this idyllic stretch is Puerto Cortes, a bustling port famous for its trade in bananas with strong Spanish heritage, signs of which survive to this day – get out to Omoa, a picture-postcard seaside town with a colonial fortress to explore. If you’re really serious about sniffing out the prettiest post-colonial towns, look no further than the quaint Spanish houses, ornate cathedral and packed plazas in Comayagua’s historic town centre. A small city two hours drive northwest from Honduras’s capital, Tegucigalpa, Comayagua was once the country’s religious and political centre, but today its main draws are the colonial buildings and cute plaza cafés – bag a traditional Honduran baguette or bistek(steak) sandwich from café La Casa de Sandwich for about £1.50 and picnic in the nearby Parque Central.

Honduras.jpg

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s